Photo of Laney Gifford

Laney Gifford is an associate in Bradley's Litigation Practice Group. Laney graduated (summa cum laude) from the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, where she served as both student materials editor and junior editor for the Cumberland Law Review. She was a Judge Abraham Caruthers Fellow and was named Best Oralist in the Donworth Moot Court Competition. While in law school, Laney received several Scholar of Merit Awards in courses such as Civil Procedure I, Criminal Law, Business Organizations, Constitutional Law I, Professional Responsibilities, Secured Transactions, Representing Small Businesses, Advanced Evidence, Pre-Trial Practice and Procedure, Municipal Courts, and Federal Courts. She also served as a judicial intern for the Hon. R. David Proctor of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.

No Worse for Butter: Ninth Circuit Says Popcorn’s “Secret” Ingredient Does Not Confer Article III StandingThe Ninth Circuit recently determined that the mere presence of artificial trans fats in popcorn (i.e., the “butter” in butter flavored popcorn) does not create an injury that confers Article III standing.

In McGee v. S-L Snacks National, a consumer brought a putative class action alleging economic and physical injuries caused by

Injury-in-Fact vs. Actual Damages –– Avoiding a Jurisdictional Sideshow in Data Breach Class Actions by Challenging Damages, Not InjuryFollowing the Supreme Court’s ruling in Spokeo v. Robins, which held that federal plaintiffs alleging a statutory violation must have suffered a real, concrete injury in order to have Article III standing, many defendants began to assert lack of standing as a defense in data breach class actions in federal court. Data breach cases

Illinois Supreme Court Adopts Expansive Interpretation of Standing under Illinois BIPA, Potentially Opening the Flood Gates for Class ActionsIn a much-anticipated ruling, the Illinois Supreme Court recently held that allegations of actual injury are not required to seek damages under Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA or the Act). The case is Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corporation, and after Rosenbach, “an individual need not allege some actual injury or