Injury-in-Fact vs. Actual Damages –– Avoiding a Jurisdictional Sideshow in Data Breach Class Actions by Challenging Damages, Not InjuryFollowing the Supreme Court’s ruling in Spokeo v. Robins, which held that federal plaintiffs alleging a statutory violation must have suffered a real, concrete injury in order to have Article III standing, many defendants began to assert lack of standing as a defense in data breach class actions in federal court. Data breach cases

Standing in Data Breach Cases Likely Heading Back to the Supreme CourtData breach plaintiffs often have a very difficult time stating a concrete injury, and courts have wrestled with whether these plaintiffs can file suit in federal court. We have been watching this issue and writing about it frequently. The issue is whether plaintiffs have suffered an “injury in fact” that gives them Article III

Spokeo v. Robins – which confirmed that a plaintiff’s allegation of a defendant’s statutory violation without accompanying concrete harm fails to satisfy Article III’s “case or controversy” requirement – has brought the issue of standing to the forefront in a variety of class action cases. Standing has become a frequent weapon in the defense’s arsenal,